Sunday, November 30, 2008

Norman Spector's Advice to the Governor General

Political pundit, Norman Spector, offers Canada's Governor General, Michaëlle Jean, some very wise advice: If the elected prime minister, Stephen Harper, requests that a new election occur to let the people decide whether they support the Conservatives or the Cabal de Trois then the people should be given this opportunity. He argues, correctly, that there is absolutely no historical precedent to do otherwise. She does indeed have the power to do otherwise, but risks a severe constitutional crisis and disenfranchisement of Western Canadian voters.

Here's a key part of what Spector wrote:

I'm still skeptical that the Liberals will be able to work out their internal rivalries. Or, that they, the NDP and Bloc could put together a common program to present to the Governor-General that would last two years—as was the case in Ontario in 1985. If I'm wrong, however, Ms. Jean would be wise not to forget that in Canada, "the people choose their government."

An election, while costly, would present Canadians with a clear choice between Mr. Harper's Conservatives and the coalition being proposed by the three opposition parties. The alternative is the very real possibility of a constitutional crisis.

If Ms. Jean were to decide to hand power over to a Liberal-led coalition, Conservative voters would be furious. Western Canadians, in particular, would feel that the government had been stolen from them. Outside Québec, there would be strong resentment against a party dedicated to breaking up Canada having a role in governing the country.

2 comments:

Rick in MB said...

The fact that Ms. Jean would event give this ridiculous notion credibility proves that she is not qualified for the position she holds.

md said...

This reminds us what a poor choice Jean was as Governor General. She and her husband's association with radical separatists, the most egregious being one of the Rose brothers, should have disqualified her from the start. Her French citizenship was, IMO, the least troubling part of her choice. In a period of instability like this, it's all the more important to have a head of state that all Canadians believe has the interests of the country as a whole at heart. If Harper's government survives the current crisis, I suggest Jean resign for the good of the nation, and hope that Harper appoints someone absolutely non-controversial.